Waxing Crescent Moon w/Stars and Clouds

Posted by
Craig (Vacaville, California, United States) on 14 January 2008 in Plant & Nature and Portfolio.

Moon study XXVII sequence II

SONY DSC-H5 30/1 second F/2.8 ISO 80 6 mm

Chinky from Manila, Philippines

this is so unbelievably beautiful! how were you able to capture the moon?

14 Jan 2008 5:43am

@Chinky: Waxing Crescent Moon w/Stars and Clouds

The image is a composite image consisting of a photograph of the stars and clouds and another photograph of the moon.

The stars and clouds exposure

1. I went up into the mountains far away from city lights on a “new moon” night.

2. I opened up my aperture fully (as wide as it would go).

3. I set the exposure up to as long as I could (30 seconds). My camera doesn’t have a bulb setting.

4. I put the camera on a tripod and pointed it straight up.

5. I noticed some clouds heading my way so I timed the exposure to coincide with the passing of the clouds.

6. So as not to jerk the camera when I fired the shutter, I used the self timer if I remember right.

The Moon Exposure

1. I put the camera on a tripod

2. I stopped down as far as I could (F8).

3. I adjusted the shutter speed until I could see good detail in the moon on my LCD screen

4. I slapped my 1.7 X tele converter on the camera and zoomed all the way in as far as it would go (15X magnification without the tele converter) . This gave me a 790 mm lens (in 35mm terms).

5. Used the self timer to fire the shutter

Photoshop

1. Opened up the stars and clouds image and duplicated the background layer twice.

2. I made a new blank layer and put it between the top two copies of the background layer.

3. I opened up the Moon Exposure

4. I selected the background and inversed the selection so that only the moon was selected.

5. I moved the selected moon over to the blank layer in the stars and clouds image.

6. I reduced the opacity of the top layer (of the new composite) so I could see where the moon was and positioned the moon where I wanted it. Then increase the opacity of the top layer to 100%

7. Next I created a mask in the top layer and etched out a hole in the top layer right over the moon with a small soft round brush.

Conclusion

Well, those are the basics. It was fun because I started with images that I had posted previously and didn’t have to pay a whole lot of attention to the details in each of the two original images.

Antares from Chennai, India

Hey this is fantastic once again. Is it a composite?, As I've been trying to do something like this without any success

14 Jan 2008 6:59am

@Antares: Waxing Crescent Moon w/Stars and Clouds

The image is a composite image consisting of a photograph of the stars and clouds and another photograph of the moon.

The stars and clouds exposure

1. I went up into the mountains far away from city lights on a “new moon” night.

2. I opened up my aperture fully (as wide as it would go).

3. I set the exposure up to as long as I could (30 seconds). My camera doesn’t have a bulb setting.

4. I put the camera on a tripod and pointed it straight up.

5. I noticed some clouds heading my way so I timed the exposure to coincide with the passing of the clouds.

6. So as not to jerk the camera when I fired the shutter, I used the self timer if I remember right.

The Moon Exposure

1. I put the camera on a tripod

2. I stopped down as far as I could (F8).

3. I adjusted the shutter speed until I could see good detail in the moon on my LCD screen

4. I slapped my 1.7 X tele converter on the camera and zoomed all the way in as far as it would go (15X magnification without the tele converter) . This gave me a 790 mm lens (in 35mm terms).

5. Used the self timer to fire the shutter

Photoshop

1. Opened up the stars and clouds image and duplicated the background layer twice.

2. I made a new blank layer and put it between the top two copies of the background layer.

3. I opened up the Moon Exposure

4. I selected the background and inversed the selection so that only the moon was selected.

5. I moved the selected moon over to the blank layer in the stars and clouds image.

6. I reduced the opacity of the top layer (of the new composite) so I could see where the moon was and positioned the moon where I wanted it. Then increase the opacity of the top layer to 100%

7. Next I created a mask in the top layer and etched out a hole in the top layer right over the moon with a small soft round brush.

Conclusion

Well, those are the basics. It was fun because I started with images that I had posted previously and didn’t have to pay a whole lot of attention to the details in each of the two original images.

GJC from Kyoto, Japan

Very, very impressive.

14 Jan 2008 7:22am

MaryB from Staffordshire, United Kingdom

Wow! this is beautiful!

14 Jan 2008 7:29am

martie from Japan

I am nearly speechless! This has a 3-D effect and is stunning! Fantastic!!!!!

14 Jan 2008 8:53am

Betty from New Jersey, United States

This is a spectacular photo! Absolutely beautiful! How did you capture the moon like this? It is so difficult to photograph!

14 Jan 2008 10:56am

@Betty: Waxing Crescent Moon w/Stars and Clouds

The image is a composite image consisting of a photograph of the stars and clouds and another photograph of the moon.

The stars and clouds exposure

1. I went up into the mountains far away from city lights on a “new moon” night.

2. I opened up my aperture fully (as wide as it would go).

3. I set the exposure up to as long as I could (30 seconds). My camera doesn’t have a bulb setting.

4. I put the camera on a tripod and pointed it straight up.

5. I noticed some clouds heading my way so I timed the exposure to coincide with the passing of the clouds.

6. So as not to jerk the camera when I fired the shutter, I used the self timer if I remember right.

The Moon Exposure

1. I put the camera on a tripod

2. I stopped down as far as I could (F8).

3. I adjusted the shutter speed until I could see good detail in the moon on my LCD screen

4. I slapped my 1.7 X tele converter on the camera and zoomed all the way in as far as it would go (15X magnification without the tele converter) . This gave me a 790 mm lens (in 35mm terms).

5. Used the self timer to fire the shutter

Photoshop

1. Opened up the stars and clouds image and duplicated the background layer twice.

2. I made a new blank layer and put it between the top two copies of the background layer.

3. I opened up the Moon Exposure

4. I selected the background and inversed the selection so that only the moon was selected.

5. I moved the selected moon over to the blank layer in the stars and clouds image.

6. I reduced the opacity of the top layer (of the new composite) so I could see where the moon was and positioned the moon where I wanted it. Then increase the opacity of the top layer to 100%

7. Next I created a mask in the top layer and etched out a hole in the top layer right over the moon with a small soft round brush.

Conclusion

Well, those are the basics. It was fun because I started with images that I had posted previously and didn’t have to pay a whole lot of attention to the details in each of the two original images.

Scene by Sharon Photography from Kingston, Ontario, Canada

Absolutely stunning - how did you manage to capture it?

14 Jan 2008 11:29am

@Scene by Sharon Photography: Waxing Crescent Moon w/Stars and Clouds

The image is a composite image consisting of a photograph of the stars and clouds and another photograph of the moon.

The stars and clouds exposure

1. I went up into the mountains far away from city lights on a “new moon” night.

2. I opened up my aperture fully (as wide as it would go).

3. I set the exposure up to as long as I could (30 seconds). My camera doesn’t have a bulb setting.

4. I put the camera on a tripod and pointed it straight up.

5. I noticed some clouds heading my way so I timed the exposure to coincide with the passing of the clouds.

6. So as not to jerk the camera when I fired the shutter, I used the self timer if I remember right.

The Moon Exposure

1. I put the camera on a tripod

2. I stopped down as far as I could (F8).

3. I adjusted the shutter speed until I could see good detail in the moon on my LCD screen

4. I slapped my 1.7 X tele converter on the camera and zoomed all the way in as far as it would go (15X magnification without the tele converter) . This gave me a 790 mm lens (in 35mm terms).

5. Used the self timer to fire the shutter

Photoshop

1. Opened up the stars and clouds image and duplicated the background layer twice.

2. I made a new blank layer and put it between the top two copies of the background layer.

3. I opened up the Moon Exposure

4. I selected the background and inversed the selection so that only the moon was selected.

5. I moved the selected moon over to the blank layer in the stars and clouds image.

6. I reduced the opacity of the top layer (of the new composite) so I could see where the moon was and positioned the moon where I wanted it. Then increase the opacity of the top layer to 100%

7. Next I created a mask in the top layer and etched out a hole in the top layer right over the moon with a small soft round brush.

Conclusion

Well, those are the basics. It was fun because I started with images that I had posted previously and didn’t have to pay a whole lot of attention to the details in each of the two original images.

badala from Leiria, Portugal

Magnificent.

14 Jan 2008 11:54am

Ina from Krugersdorp, South Africa

You are joking right!? I don't believe this, it is too magnificent to be true!! Great capture, lovely colors.

14 Jan 2008 12:03pm

Daroru from Amagasaki, Japan

Woah! Beautiful work Craiger!

14 Jan 2008 12:31pm

Betsy Barron : www.thebetsy.com from Glenmoore, United States

AH CRAIGER YOU'RE KILLIN ME! These shots are amazing.. I have photog envy!

14 Jan 2008 12:38pm

Viewfinder from Bradenton, United States

I agree with Betsy -- how do you do this? We need a workshop!

14 Jan 2008 12:46pm

@Viewfinder: Waxing Crescent Moon w/Stars and Clouds

The image is a composite image consisting of a photograph of the stars and clouds and another photograph of the moon.

The stars and clouds exposure

1. I went up into the mountains far away from city lights on a “new moon” night.

2. I opened up my aperture fully (as wide as it would go).

3. I set the exposure up to as long as I could (30 seconds). My camera doesn’t have a bulb setting.

4. I put the camera on a tripod and pointed it straight up.

5. I noticed some clouds heading my way so I timed the exposure to coincide with the passing of the clouds.

6. So as not to jerk the camera when I fired the shutter, I used the self timer if I remember right.

The Moon Exposure

1. I put the camera on a tripod

2. I stopped down as far as I could (F8).

3. I adjusted the shutter speed until I could see good detail in the moon on my LCD screen

4. I slapped my 1.7 X tele converter on the camera and zoomed all the way in as far as it would go (15X magnification without the tele converter) . This gave me a 790 mm lens (in 35mm terms).

5. Used the self timer to fire the shutter

Photoshop

1. Opened up the stars and clouds image and duplicated the background layer twice.

2. I made a new blank layer and put it between the top two copies of the background layer.

3. I opened up the Moon Exposure

4. I selected the background and inversed the selection so that only the moon was selected.

5. I moved the selected moon over to the blank layer in the stars and clouds image.

6. I reduced the opacity of the top layer (of the new composite) so I could see where the moon was and positioned the moon where I wanted it. Then increase the opacity of the top layer to 100%

7. Next I created a mask in the top layer and etched out a hole in the top layer right over the moon with a small soft round brush.

Conclusion

Well, those are the basics. It was fun because I started with images that I had posted previously and didn’t have to pay a whole lot of attention to the details in each of the two original images.

MJ from Delaware, United States

Picture of wonder.. It is a great shot of the night sky...How did you do it?

14 Jan 2008 1:18pm

@MJ: Waxing Crescent Moon w/Stars and Clouds

The image is a composite image consisting of a photograph of the stars and clouds and another photograph of the moon.

The stars and clouds exposure

1. I went up into the mountains far away from city lights on a “new moon” night.

2. I opened up my aperture fully (as wide as it would go).

3. I set the exposure up to as long as I could (30 seconds). My camera doesn’t have a bulb setting.

4. I put the camera on a tripod and pointed it straight up.

5. I noticed some clouds heading my way so I timed the exposure to coincide with the passing of the clouds.

6. So as not to jerk the camera when I fired the shutter, I used the self timer if I remember right.

The Moon Exposure

1. I put the camera on a tripod

2. I stopped down as far as I could (F8).

3. I adjusted the shutter speed until I could see good detail in the moon on my LCD screen

4. I slapped my 1.7 X tele converter on the camera and zoomed all the way in as far as it would go (15X magnification without the tele converter) . This gave me a 790 mm lens (in 35mm terms).

5. Used the self timer to fire the shutter

Photoshop

1. Opened up the stars and clouds image and duplicated the background layer twice.

2. I made a new blank layer and put it between the top two copies of the background layer.

3. I opened up the Moon Exposure

4. I selected the background and inversed the selection so that only the moon was selected.

5. I moved the selected moon over to the blank layer in the stars and clouds image.

6. I reduced the opacity of the top layer (of the new composite) so I could see where the moon was and positioned the moon where I wanted it. Then increase the opacity of the top layer to 100%

7. Next I created a mask in the top layer and etched out a hole in the top layer right over the moon with a small soft round brush.

Conclusion

Well, those are the basics. It was fun because I started with images that I had posted previously and didn’t have to pay a whole lot of attention to the details in each of the two original images.

MontereyJohn from Salinas, California, United States

Geezers, that is GOOD!

14 Jan 2008 1:34pm

KMF from Kerala,Kalpakanchery, India

wounderfull

14 Jan 2008 1:49pm

kairospix from Singapore, Singapore

awesome!

14 Jan 2008 2:12pm

Laurie from New Jersey, United States

STUNNING!!! Fantastic shot!

14 Jan 2008 2:15pm

Nishana from Calicut, India

just awesome..i agree wth all above..we need a workshop! :)

14 Jan 2008 2:42pm

@Nishana: Waxing Crescent Moon w/Stars and Clouds

The image is a composite image consisting of a photograph of the stars and clouds and another photograph of the moon.

The stars and clouds exposure

1. I went up into the mountains far away from city lights on a “new moon” night.

2. I opened up my aperture fully (as wide as it would go).

3. I set the exposure up to as long as I could (30 seconds). My camera doesn’t have a bulb setting.

4. I put the camera on a tripod and pointed it straight up.

5. I noticed some clouds heading my way so I timed the exposure to coincide with the passing of the clouds.

6. So as not to jerk the camera when I fired the shutter, I used the self timer if I remember right.

The Moon Exposure

1. I put the camera on a tripod

2. I stopped down as far as I could (F8).

3. I adjusted the shutter speed until I could see good detail in the moon on my LCD screen

4. I slapped my 1.7 X tele converter on the camera and zoomed all the way in as far as it would go (15X magnification without the tele converter) . This gave me a 790 mm lens (in 35mm terms).

5. Used the self timer to fire the shutter

Photoshop

1. Opened up the stars and clouds image and duplicated the background layer twice.

2. I made a new blank layer and put it between the top two copies of the background layer.

3. I opened up the Moon Exposure

4. I selected the background and inversed the selection so that only the moon was selected.

5. I moved the selected moon over to the blank layer in the stars and clouds image.

6. I reduced the opacity of the top layer (of the new composite) so I could see where the moon was and positioned the moon where I wanted it. Then increase the opacity of the top layer to 100%

7. Next I created a mask in the top layer and etched out a hole in the top layer right over the moon with a small soft round brush.

Conclusion

Well, those are the basics. It was fun because I started with images that I had posted previously and didn’t have to pay a whole lot of attention to the details in each of the two original images.

aLv|N from Melbourne, Australia

man.. i have to say i am impress! how did u manage to do it? mind teaching me please?

14 Jan 2008 3:03pm

@aLv|N: Waxing Crescent Moon w/Stars and Clouds

The image is a composite image consisting of a photograph of the stars and clouds and another photograph of the moon.

The stars and clouds exposure

1. I went up into the mountains far away from city lights on a “new moon” night.

2. I opened up my aperture fully (as wide as it would go).

3. I set the exposure up to as long as I could (30 seconds). My camera doesn’t have a bulb setting.

4. I put the camera on a tripod and pointed it straight up.

5. I noticed some clouds heading my way so I timed the exposure to coincide with the passing of the clouds.

6. So as not to jerk the camera when I fired the shutter, I used the self timer if I remember right.

The Moon Exposure

1. I put the camera on a tripod

2. I stopped down as far as I could (F8).

3. I adjusted the shutter speed until I could see good detail in the moon on my LCD screen

4. I slapped my 1.7 X tele converter on the camera and zoomed all the way in as far as it would go (15X magnification without the tele converter) . This gave me a 790 mm lens (in 35mm terms).

5. Used the self timer to fire the shutter

Photoshop

1. Opened up the stars and clouds image and duplicated the background layer twice.

2. I made a new blank layer and put it between the top two copies of the background layer.

3. I opened up the Moon Exposure

4. I selected the background and inversed the selection so that only the moon was selected.

5. I moved the selected moon over to the blank layer in the stars and clouds image.

6. I reduced the opacity of the top layer (of the new composite) so I could see where the moon was and positioned the moon where I wanted it. Then increase the opacity of the top layer to 100%

7. Next I created a mask in the top layer and etched out a hole in the top layer right over the moon with a small soft round brush.

Conclusion

Well, those are the basics. It was fun because I started with images that I had posted previously and didn’t have to pay a whole lot of attention to the details in each of the two original images.

Lorraine from Gatineau, Canada

sigh...enchantment!

14 Jan 2008 3:40pm

Samwad from Mumbai, India

men thats awesome photo, em speechless about it.
and thing abt my photo "lily" actually em following my concept "photopainting" as a painting tht photos sharpness wud b less so i shoot at 200 ISO with large Aperture

14 Jan 2008 4:02pm

@Samwad: OK, now I see why you shot at ISO 200. I was wondering why you didn't shoot at a much lower ISO and an even larger aperture. But, if you did that then you wouldn't have had the good depth of field, as in your photograph!

Paulski from Muncie, United States

wow. very very cool shot. love the clouds...

14 Jan 2008 4:30pm

ManuelaR from Hainburg, Germany

Absolutely amazing capture!

14 Jan 2008 5:01pm

Oswegan from Lake Oswego, United States

That's a really great shot my friend.

14 Jan 2008 5:47pm

amy from Rocky Mountain House, Canada

Oh Craig!! Even better than yesterday's with those clouds and stars... Outstanding!!!

14 Jan 2008 6:37pm

Michael from Wuppertal, Germany

Stunning, my friend, really really stunning!

14 Jan 2008 7:42pm

Laurent from Lyon, France

wonderful shot. It seems to be a "photo-montage" isn't it?
but wether "photo-montage" nor real picture, it is wonderful

14 Jan 2008 8:01pm

@Laurent: Yes, it is a composite image of two previous images.

Jason Kravitz from Brussels, Belgium

great composite - A widescreen version of this would make a nice desktop background - well done Craiger.

14 Jan 2008 8:40pm

@Jason Kravitz: Tell me what your screen resolution is. I'll do my best.

standley from brou-sur-chantereine, France

Stunning shot. I have read your explanation. Great job!

14 Jan 2008 8:56pm

Wolfgang Prigge from Canada

The clouds look like a very pale aurora borealis..

14 Jan 2008 9:13pm

James from Canada

Wonderful post-production, and excellent colour on the moon. I like the sense of motion you get with the lights in the sky as well.

14 Jan 2008 9:54pm

Damon Schreiber from Toronto, Canada

Superb!

14 Jan 2008 10:31pm

Rebecca from Leicester, United Kingdom

Absolutely phenomenal work. WOW to the nth degree!!

14 Jan 2008 10:56pm

Reza from Montreal, Canada

Wow!

15 Jan 2008 12:27am

Photographs by M.E. from Encino, United States

that's an awesome, awesome shot! and many thanks for letting us know how you shoot it!

15 Jan 2008 1:21am

@Photographs by M.E.: Many thanks M.E.!!! I have marvelous fun photography. You are always welcome at my site and I always appreciate your comments!

Dawn Sutherland from Phoenix, United States

I love that!! Very cool, very clever and awesome PP.

15 Jan 2008 2:58am

Sandrine from Cincinnati, United States

Beautiful image! PERFECT capture!

15 Jan 2008 9:24pm

Zing from Hamilton, New Zealand

Wow!

16 Jan 2008 5:32am

Damon Schreiber from Toronto, Canada

Great stuff!

20 Jan 2008 5:16pm

Anita from West Nottingham, United States

Fabulous photos of the moon!

27 Jan 2008 8:34pm

Jeff from Honolulu, United States

Wonderful work...and a great description of your process. This is pure pleasure to view.

13 Feb 2008 9:03am

Wysterior from Kloten, Switzerland

Awesome work, congratulations! I've just read your description... very well done !
Cya Wys

21 Mar 2008 7:14pm

K. Stephane from Paris, France

Stunning Shot =)

25 Mar 2008 1:12am

SONY DSC-H5
30/1 second
F/2.8
ISO 80
6 mm

moon